Archive | Stan Sudol Columns/Media References and Appearances

TV Ontario’s The Agenda – Steve Paikin Interviews With Mining Industry and NGO Critics (TV Ontario – May 31, 2017)

Toronto: Mining Capital of the World

Ask yourself: what’s the most important mining city in Ontario? Sudbury? Timmins? You could argue, it’s Toronto, where almost 60 per cent of all publicly-traded mining companies in the world are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX-Venture Exchange. And while all that may be well known to those in the business world, it’s far from widely appreciated beyond that. The Agenda discusses how Toronto rose to be a mining capital. Continue Reading →

Harte Gold Corporation’s Developing Mine: A New Camp in the Making Adjacent to Hemlo? – by Stan Sudol  (March 2017)


Harte Gold Corp. President and CEO Stephen G. Roman

Harte Gold Corporation is one of those “under the radar” junior explorers that is now well on its way to developing a high grade underground gold mine adjacent to northern Ontario’s world-class Hemlo camp where roughly 22 million ounces of gold have been produced to date since 1985.

Back in September 2008, when Stephen G. Roman and his partners sold their Gold Eagle Mine project in Ontario’s Red Lake gold camp, to Goldcorp for $1.5 billion, it took just one month for him to start investigating another project.

By early 2009, Roman took charge of Harte Gold, an underperforming gold exploration company that was on the verge of being de-listed. It took him about a year and half to put the corporation’s finances in order and acquire Corona Gold Corp’s 51% ownership of the property. Continue Reading →

Proud Canadian mining sector for a strong nation – by Marilyn Scales (Canadian Mining Journal – February/March 2017)

http://www.canadianminingjournal.com/

Canada is celebrating the 150th anniversary of Confederation. In 1867 the founding fathers met in Charlottetown built the foundation of a nation truly “strong and free”. They did a very good job, too. We can savour their hard work as we join in various celebrations around the country.

One of the reasons to be proud of Canada is its vast storehouse of natural resources and the men and enterprises that put us among the world’s premier mineral producers – gold, uranium, potash, base metals, diamonds, and the metals of the future. Our mineral legacy has also given rise to some of the world’s best technology for finding, mining and processing those riches.

Let’s take a look at the first person to be caught up in our mineral wealth. While Martin Frobisher searched for the Northwest Passage, he ballasted his ships with shiny yellow rocks. What he thought would be his fortune was pyrite, not gold, and his mistake was not pointed out until he had made another voyage and collected even more rocks. The lesson is: Never send a ship captain to do a geologist’s job.

French king Louis XIV granted what are probably the first mineral concessions on Cape Breton Island to Nicolas Denys who discovered coal there in 1672. For the next 200 years mining was small scale, done to meet local needs. Continue Reading →

Barrick’s Munk Heads Top Ten Most Important Mining Men in Canadian History – by Stan Sudol

Melanie and Peter Munk

Melanie and Peter Munk

Four Americans Made the List!

A few months ago, my dear colleague Joe Martin, who is the Director of the Canadian Business & Financial History Initiative at Rotman and President Emeritus of Canada’s History Society, asked me a very simple question: who would be considered the most important individual in Canadian mining?

Considering Canada’s lengthy and exceptional expertise in the mineral sector, it was not an easy answer and I decided to research and create a top ten list of the most important mining men in Canadian history.

The lack of women on this list simply reflects the fact that for much of our history most women were not given the educational or social opportunities to excel in business, especially in a rough and male-dominated sector like mining. Times have changed, women are playing key roles in mining today and will definitely be included on this list in the future.

However, a few qualifiers need to be established. This is basically a list of mine builders not mine finders.  Building a company through takeovers and discoveries is one way but I am also focusing on individuals who have built corporate empires and/or who have developed isolated regions of the country with the necessary infrastructure for mines to flourish and create multi-generational jobs, shareholder wealth and great economic impact. Continue Reading →

[The Great Provincial Divide – Northern Ontario Separation] – The Agenda’s Steve Paikin interviews Laure Paquette, Erik White and Stan Sudol (March 11, 2016)

http://theagenda.tvo.org/

The Agenda explores the idea of northern Ontario separating from the south.

Laure Paquette is an Associate Professor at Lakehead University’s Political Science department in Thunder Bay.

Erik White is a journalist at CBC Radio Sudbury.

Stan Sudol is publisher/editor of RepublicOfMining.com, a mining aggregator website, freelance mining columnist for the Sudbury Star and communications consultant in Toronto.

 

Infrastructure in the Ring of Fire: ‘Getting it Right’ rather than just Getting it Soon – by Chief Elizabeth Atlookan

Elizabeth Atlookan is Chief of Eabametoong First Nation and a member of the Matawa Tribal Council.

On March 11, 2016 the Financial Post and Sudbury Star published an article by Mr. Stan Sudol that called for rapid Federal investment in industrial Ring of Fire and community infrastructure, based on a ‘Mining Marshall Plan’ concept that he published in July 2015. Is a Marshall Plan needed? No. Rather, our First Nations and Ontario need to collaborate on a new, long-­‐term vision of human and environmental life that can incorporate wise industrial development. Let’s work together on that.

As the Chief of Eabametoong First Nation, I write from a remote community of roughly 2500 members, with about 1400 living on-­‐reserve approximately 400kms North of Thunder Bay. Eabametoong First Nation has been referenced in multiple news stories lately. These stories have outlined a number of tragic losses throughout our winter. In particular, we have suffered a suicide in February, the loss of an infant earlier this month, and one of our members falling victim to a homicide just over a week ago.

I write from the context of social crisis. This is something that has been documented, but rarely from the perspective of community leader who is facing so much local pain and difficulty, while navigating tremendous pressure for industrial development nearby. Continue Reading →

Sudbury letter: Ring of Fire progresss – minister – by Michael Gravelle (Sudbury Star – March 14, 2016)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

Michael Gravelle is the current Minister of Northern Development and Mines.

Minister Gravelle was in charge this ministry when Cliffs Natural Resources became so frustrated with Ontario government inaction, incompetence and inept mining policy that the company decided cancel its proposed $3.3 billion chromite investment in the Ring of Fire, permanently damaging the province’s international reputation in mining circles. – Stan Sudol

Thank you for the opportunity to respond to Stan Sudol’s recent guest column regarding development in the Ring of Fire (“PM can save project,” The Sudbury Star, Tuesday, March 8).

The Ring of Fire presents a historic opportunity to drive positive economic outcomes for the region, the province and Canada as a whole. Its smart, responsible and sustainable development must include strong commitments to improve the living conditions of people and infrastructure surrounding the Ring of Fire.

Realizing the full potential of the region will require collaboration from several partners, including the provincial and federal governments. However, our government has already driven much progress in laying the groundwork to drive development in the region. Continue Reading →

What Ontario needs to unlock Ring of Fire’s mineral wealth is a Marshall Plan – by Stan Sudol (Financial Post – March 10, 2016)

http://business.financialpost.com/

Stan Sudol is a Toronto-based communications consultant, mining policy analyst and publisher/editor of www.republicofmining.com.

Ontario’s “Ring of Fire” mineral belt, located in the province’s remote James Bay Lowlands, is thought to hold more than $60 billion of geological riches. When the belt was discovered in 2007, it was supposed to usher in a new era of prosperity for Northern Ontario, especially for the impoverished First Nations communities in the region.

Almost a decade later, the ore remains in the ground and doesn’t appear to be coming out anytime soon. Thanks to the Ontario government’s ineptitude, dysfunctional mining policy, lack of promised infrastructure spending and (to a much lesser extent) a broader commodity slump, American miner Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. left the province in frustration in 2013, permanently halting its proposed US$3.3-billion chromite project.

The ultimate indignity for Ontario came last year, when Cliffs sold its US$550-million investment in the Ring of Fire to junior miner Noront Resources Ltd. — the only significant player left in the area — for a bargain-basement price of US$27.5 million. Continue Reading →

PM can save Ring of Fire – by Stan Sudol (Sudbury Star – March 8, 2016)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

Sudbury Star columnist calls for a Trudeau ‘Marshall Plan’ for Ontario’s Ring of Fire

Ontario’s “Ring of Fire” mineral belt, located in the province’s remote James Bay Lowlands, is thought to hold more than $60 billion of geological riches. When it was discovered in 2007, it was supposed to usher in a new era of prosperity for Northern Ontario, especially for the impoverished First Nations communities in the region.

Almost a decade later, the ore remains in the ground and doesn’t appear to be coming out anytime soon. Thanks to the Ontario government’s ineptitude, dysfunctional mining policy, lack of promised infrastructure spending and (to a much lesser extent) a broader commodity slump, American miner Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. left the province in frustration in 2013, permanently halting its proposed US$3.3-billion chromite project.

The ultimate indignity for Ontario came last year, when Cliffs sold its US$550-million investment in the Ring of Fire to junior miner Noront Resources Ltd. — the only significant player left in the area — for a bargain-basement price of US$27.5 million.

At the present time, Noront is focused primarily on its bankable Eagles Nest nickel/copper/PGM property, valued at about $10 billion, which can be developed only if a proposed east-west road is built into the mining camp and has put its world-class chromite deposits on the backburner for the foreseeable future. Continue Reading →

Can ‘superblimp’ unlock hidden riches of Africa? (CNN.com – February 24, 2016)

http://www.cnn.com/

Mining consultant Stan Sudol, publisher of respected industry website republicofmining.com,
agrees the ship could be a game changer, that will allow commodities to be fast-tracked to 
market “They can be used to set up initial mine site development for less cost in a faster time-
frame as no local airstrip is necessary to start cargo delivery,” says Sudol.

(CNN)Best known for floating aimlessly above sports stadiums, and for their slightly comic, bloated shape, blimps are an unlikely subject for a 21st century revival.

But after 20 years of development, Lockheed Martin and Hybrid Enterprises are poised to unleash a revolutionary new design that could unlock resources worth billions of dollars across the African continent.

The Hybrid Airship is a helium-powered craft that can cover thousands of kilometers in a single journey, with a top speed of 60 knots. The craft can take off and land without a runway, and the cavernous interior can carry loads of 20 tons. Continue Reading →

Reaction to Ontario Auditors General’s slamming report on mining ministry – Morning North’s Markus Schwabe Interviews Mining Columnist Stan Sudol (CBC News Sudbury – December 03, 2015)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury

Has the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines done enough to encourage mining exploration and development? Ontario’s Auditor General doesn’t think so. Stan Sudol is a mining columnist and owner/editor of a mining aggregator website called www.repubicofmining.com . He joined for some analysis and didn’t mince words.

Click here for the interview:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/programs/morningnorth/reaction-to-ontario-auditors-general-s-slamming-report-on-mining-ministry-1.3348908

Stan Sudol Mea Culpa – Regarding the Morning North Interview: “It has come to my attention that the Ontario Chamber of Commerce (OCC) did indeed talk to CEMI. They may have also talked to other Sudbury –based researchers. Continue Reading →

Province dinged on the ‘Ring of Fire’ – by Carol Mulligan (Sudbury Star – December 3, 2015)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

Ontario auditor-general Bonnie Lysyk’s value-for-money annual report, as it pertains to the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, outlines a pattern of inaction by the Liberal government to do anything to develop the Ring of Fire.

The province has shirked its responsibility to consult with first nations near the Ring of Fire, leaving that up to private companies, says Lysyk in the report.

It created a Ring of Fire secretariat in 2010 that has 19 employees and has spent $13.2 million in the last five years while missing deadlines established by the ministry and lacking performance measures to assess its effectiveness.

Not a penny of the $1 billion promised by the province to develop Ring of Fire infrastructure has been spent, said the auditor-general. Continue Reading →

Memories from the University of Inco – by Stan Sudol

Stan Sudol in the 1990s.

Stan Sudol in the 1990s.

I am an Inco brat. I was born and raised in the shadows of those tall industrial smokestacks that tower over the city of Sudbury, Canada. In the days when I turned 18 in the late 1970s, if you didn’t go to university, then it was almost a rite of passage to work for “Mother Inco,” as it was affectionately (or derisively) known.

For most students today, the prospects of a good-paying summer job to help finance post-secondary education has become an elusive dream. Skyrocketing tuition fees combined with minimum-wage work equals enormous debt at graduation.

I truly feel sorry for these students, as my own experiences in the decade of disco included a wonderful combination of affordable tuition fees and blue-collar union employment that made a major contribution to my post-secondary education costs. Continue Reading →

Mining analyst Stan Sudol weighs in on Ring of Fire development – Interviewed by Up North’s Jason Turnbull (CBC News Sudbury – November 6, 2015)

This week at Queen’s Park, the PCs said the Liberals were planning a tax on chromite. Analyst Stan Sudol weighed in.

Click here for interview: http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/2678464492/

Progress on Ring of Fire development: slow and fraught with complications – by Jax Jacobsen (SNL.com – July 14, 2015)

https://www.snl.com/

When Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. suspended development on its chromite project in Ontario’s remote Ring of Fire in November 2013, many saw it as an opportunity for the province to get serious about addressing critical infrastructure and Aboriginal issues.

The Ring of Fire region, located in northwestern Ontario near the Manitoba border, is believed to possess between C$30 billion and C$50 billion in mineral resources, with Ontario’s Ministry of Northern Development and Mines estimating its value as high as C$60 billion. The Ontario Chamber of Commerce argued that development will generate as much as C$9.4 billion in GDP and create up to 5,500 jobs on an annual basis, all within the first 10 years of development.

This would be a substantial boon for the region, which is home to numerous First Nations communities but with very little business development or opportunity, due to its lack of transportation infrastructure connecting it to the rest of the province.

In May 2014, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne pledged C$1 billion for infrastructure spending to encourage mineral development in the region if she were re-elected. Wynne also pledged to create a development corporation to encourage and oversee development there. Continue Reading →