Archive | Ontario’s Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery

NEWS RELEASE: Erin O’Toole announces Energy & Natural Resources Policy

“Making the opportunities of Ontario’s Ring of Fire a national priority
by declaring chromite a nationally significant resource and the development
of the Ring of Fire as a project of national significance. This will allow
the Government of Canada to take the lead on the Ring of Fire and expedite
the transportation corridor urgently needed to attract more investment into
the many northern Ontario communities which sought to host the Ring of Fire’s
infrastructure.” Erin O’Toole

OTTAWA, February 23, 2017 – Conservative Party of Canada leadership candidate Erin O’Toole today announced his plan to reinvigorate Canada’s economy by advancing major energy and natural resource projects.

O’Toole announced that, as Prime Minister, he will support the energy and natural resource sectors by:
• Passing a National Strategic Pipelines Act, declaring major pipeline projects, including Energy East, as strategic to Canada’s economic interests. Continue Reading →

Road to the Ring of Fire – by Marilyn Scales (Canadian Mining Journal – February/March 2017)

http://www.canadianminingjournal.com/

Noront is eager to begin development at Eagle’s Nest, the first of many mines

Spirits were high in March 2015 when the Ontario government announced at the PDAC it was moving forward with an allweather road into the Ring of Fire. Here we are almost two years later, and what do we have for the more than $750,000 in tax dollars that were spent? The answer: Not much. The province has consulted with various First Nations who would welcome a road. It has yet to announce a plan, route or schedule for construction.

Seeing the politicians make a decision and actually build a road is the one thing Alan Coutts, president and CEO of Noront Resources, says is vital to get the Eagle’s Nest nickel-copper-platinum-palladium development under way. The company discovered the deposit in 2007 and sparked a staking rush that made the Ring of Fire the most written about new camp since Hemlo.

The Ring of Fire lies about 500 km northeast of Thunder Bay, Ont. The area is centred on McFaulds Lake on the edge of the James Bay Lowlands. As many as nine First Nations may be impacted by mineral development, making consultation complex. Continue Reading →

KWG favours railway to Ring – by Ben Leeson (Sudbury Star – February 13, 2017)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

KWG Resources sees a bright future for the Ring of Fire and believes the best way to reach that future is on iron rails.

KWG is an original player in the Ring, a large deposit of chromite and other metals in the mineral-rich James Bay Lowlands, about 500 kilometres north of Thunder Bay. In 2006, the company took part in the first major discovery of chromite, a key component in making stainless steel.

“We came to the realization that the biggest consumers of chromium on the planet are the Chinese stainless steel makers,” said Moe Lavigne, KWG’s vice-president of exploration and development. In the chromite-chromium-ferrochrome industry, the metals are exchanged under offtake agreements, between the resource producer and the buyer, rather than in an open market like nickel, copper and gold. Continue Reading →

Ring of Fire mining development still years away from delivering on a decade of hype – by Jody Porter (CBC News Thunder Bay – January 30, 2017)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/

Noront Resources, Neskantaga First Nation disagree even on whether they’re talking to each other

Ten years after a large chromite deposit in Ontario’s James Bay lowlands was first discovered and declared a “game-changer” for the Canadian economy, the Ring of Fire mining development is flaming out in a dispute over who is talking to whom.

Noront Resources is now the main proponent in the project after Cliffs Natural Resources pulled out of the development in 2013, but it’s relationship with one of the First Nations in the area continues to deteriorate.

“Beginning this month Noront will enter into a series of meetings with Neskantaga First Nation,” the company said in a news release dated January 17, 2017. “These meetings will be facilitated by an experienced and respected mediator with the goal of identifying a mutually agreeable path forward for the company’s current and proposed exploration and development activities.” Continue Reading →

Bogged down in the Ring of Fire – by Ella Myers (Northern Ontario Business – January 27, 2017)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Noront president says development stalled by lack of clarity on road, slow pace of regional dialogue

Noront Resources boss Alan Coutts said his company is as committed as ever to the Ring of Fire. But if things don’t get moving soon, their financiers and investors are going to lose patience.

“We’re trying,” said the Noront president-CEO at a Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce luncheon, Jan. 26. “My focus has always been on the Ring of Fire. “We don’t want to abandon it. But if there’s no money, there’s no money,” said Coutts. “[Our investors] have been patient, but they’re running out of patience.”

Coutts said that the project is stalled at two points; they need a permanent road to their remote nickel and chromite deposits in the James Bays lowlands, and they need approval on that road from the neighbouring communities belonging to the Matawa First Nations tribal council. Continue Reading →

Noront still sold on the Ring of Fire – by Ben Leeson (Sudbury Star – January 27, 2017)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

When it comes to the Ring of Fire, Noront Resources Ltd. is in it for the long haul, president and CEO Alan Coutts said Thursday.

Speaking at Bryston’s on the Park in Copper Cliff as part of the Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce President’s Luncheon Series, Coutts talked about the wealth pulled from the ground in the Sudbury area and how he sees similar potential in the Ring, a crescent rich in chromite and other minerals such as nickel and copper, located in the James Bay Lowlands, about 500 kilometres north of Thunder Bay, and dotted with five small Oji-Cree First Nations communities.

“We all know in this room the last 150 years has generated an incredible amount of wealth and prosperity from the Sudbury Basin,” Coutts said. “The Ring of Fire is almost identical in size, about 100 kilometres from tip to tail, and you can see there are already more than 20 deposits that have been discovered in that region, of various qualities and sizes.” Continue Reading →

Since ice roads won’t stay frozen, we need to get serious about building permanent roads in the far north – by John Michael McGrath (TVO.org – January 24, 2017)

http://tvo.org/

OPINION: More than 30 Ontario First Nations communities rely on winter ice roads to truck in everything from fuel to building supplies. Warm winters are jeopardizing that lifeline, and we need an alternative

The one thing that’s supposed to be reliable about Ontario’s far north is cold winters. But increasingly, warm spells in winter have delayed the opening of the ice roads that connect 31 remote First Nations communities spread across the bulk of the province’s north, from the shore of James Bay to the far northwest.

This year, while grading and packing of snow and ice clearing has started in some locations, not a single one of the province’s ice roads has opened to commercial traffic, and only half a dozen have opened for personal vehicle use.

In the province’s northeast, the Wetum Road connecting the Moose Cree First Nation and other communities farther north to the provincial highway system won’t open until next Monday at the earliest. Continue Reading →

Despite expecting further delay to RoF development, Noront exploration guns for gold – by Henry Lazenby (MiningWeekly.com – January 18, 2017)

http://www.miningweekly.com/

VANCOUVER (miningweekly.com) – Despite reporting progress with discussions between stakeholders, the largest landholder in the emerging Ring of Fire (RoF) mining camp of Northern Ontario, Noront Resources, said Tuesday that it expected further delays to the development of its cornerstone Eagle’s Nest mine.

The precious and base metals project developer said the Canadian federal government, the Ontario provincial government, First Nations and itself were advancing negotiations to establish a joint infrastructure plan for the region.

However, this process intersects with discussions between the province and the Matawa Tribal Council at the Regional Framework Table that are taking longer than expected, and that have the potential to delay the provincial government’s stated goal of having shovels in the ground by 2018. Continue Reading →

Ottawa cools to Ring of Fire’s potential – by Rachelle Younglai (Globe and Mail – December 21, 2016)

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

Ottawa has been throwing cold water on the Ring of Fire, a mineral deposit in Northern Ontario that was once thought to be worth more than $60-billion.

Since the federal Liberal Party came to power last year, the government has stonewalled requests to pay for infrastructure, lowered expectations for development and slashed its valuation for the deposit, according to internal Department of Natural Resources documents obtained by The Globe and Mail.

The skepticism among federal ranks has proven to be another barrier to mining the 5,000-square-kilometre crescent of mostly chromite in the boggy James Bay lowlands and boreal forest. Development of the Ring was already facing significant challenges: No permanent road access, no power, environmental concerns, a prolonged commodities slump and scores of unresolved issues with the nine First Nations groups that live in the region. Continue Reading →

Arrested Development: Down, down, down? Ring of Fire still a burning question – by Sunny Freeman (Financial Post – December 13, 2016)

http://business.financialpost.com/

The nine chiefs of the Matawa First Nations closest to Ontario’s Ring of Fire gathered around a conference table in July 2013 at what seemed like a historic crossroads to debate the merits of development in a region that had never before experienced it.

Promises of jobs, revenue sharing and infrastructure improvements, some said, could bring prosperity to the struggling communities. On the other hand, development could come too rapidly and at too high a cost to their land and traditional way of life. They needn’t have worried. Three years later, development of the 5,000-square-kilometre area of the James Bay Lowlands is still stuck in neutral.

The Ring of Fire is a deposit of minerals — including nickel, copper, gold, zinc and the extremely rare chromite — some 540 kilometres north of Thunder Bay that is said to be worth up to $60 billion. Dubbed “Canada’s next oilsands,” it could be the biggest resource development Ontario has seen in more than a century. Continue Reading →

It’s not time to sit and wait; First Nations should make most of mineral market lull – by Daniel Bland (Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal – November 20, 2016)

http://www.chroniclejournal.com/

Daniel Bland has spent the past four years living on the James Bay Cree reserve of Mistissini in northern Quebec, working as lead instructor for Cree Human Resources Development/Cree Nation Government on the design and delivery of basic skills and work-readiness training programs in Cree communities.

Mining and resource extraction companies across Canada continue to ride out a slump in commodity prices that market analysts suggest may continue throughout 2017 before showing signs of any extended recovery. But while that is bad news for mining companies, it could be a blessing in disguise for remote First Nations hoping to benefit from their proximity to potential mining operations.

Canadian policy institutes have paid considerable attention to determining the labour market demands of major mining projects, many on or near aboriginal land. Last fall, the Conference Board of Canada produced a forecast of employment opportunities over the next decade in resource development projects by occupation and region. Continue Reading →

Tom Dodds’ new best friends dabble in the Ring of Fire – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – November 11, 2016)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Al Coutts, president of Noront Resources, swooped into Sault Ste.Marie, Nov. 4, for a tour of the city, courtesy of the Sault Ste. Marie Economic Development Corporation.

It’s not known if this is the start of a beautiful friendship with the Ring of Fire, but the nickel and chromite mine developer decided to tweet a photo of Coutts and his chief development officer, Steve Flewelling, with economic development chief executive Tom Dodds on the city‘s waterfront.

“He came out, we gave him a tour of the town,” said Dodds, “we showed him possible areas…of industrial land that would make sense to them. “We’re walking into city hall and he says, let’s take a picture. I said, if you’re feeling inclined to publicize that you’re here, far be it for me to say no. “

Dodds cautioned that the visit was very exploratory and doesn’t want to build unrealistic expectations that the Toronto-based mine developer is in a position to target the Sault for a chromite processing operation. Continue Reading →

Few details on Ring of Fire road decision – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – November 2, 2016)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle dropped few hints as to when the province expects to roll out plans for a Ring of Fire road access corridor, saying only it will happen “soon.”

After opening a government-hosted Mining Innovation Summit in Sudbury on Nov. 1, Gravelle said in a media scrum that the province remains “keen to see the project move forward” as discussions continue with four James Bay-area First Nations over a completed community service corridor study that will provide the basis for a decision on the road’s routing.

“It’s difficult to put timelines on decision-making other than to say that we are committed to carrying on that work. The conversations are at a very high level with the Matawa First Nations and we look forward to having something to report to you soon.” Continue Reading →

Ontario invests C$2.5m in mining R&D; Minister outlines progress to position province as mining leader – by Henry Lazenby (MiningWeekly.com – November 2, 2016)

http://www.miningweekly.com/

VANCOUVER (miningweekly.com) – The Ontario government on Tuesday announced that it would invest C$2.5-million in the Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation’s (CEMI’s) ongoing work with the Ultra Deep Mining Network (UDMN), which is helping the mining sector develop and adopt commercially viable innovations. Part of a five-year initiative first started in 2014, the programme has created nearly 30 jobs in Northern Ontario to date.

The province, in partnership with the federal government, is supporting this research initiative by CEMI and UDMN, which will help mining companies and organisations develop technologies to enhance the safety, efficiency and sustainability of their operations.

Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle made the announcement during the Mining Innovation Summit 2016, hosted by Ontario in Sudbury. “Today’s Mining Innovation Summit and our investment in CEMI are proof Ontario is committed to supporting the future of the mining sector and ensuring that we are the global leader in sustainable mineral development. Continue Reading →

Grits want Ring developed too: minister – by Carol Mulligan (Sudbury Star – November 1, 2016)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

The Wynne government is as keen to advance development of the Ring of Fire as any company or individual, says Northern Development and Mines Minister Michael Gravelle.

The Ontario government is working with its partners, including Noront Resources Inc. and neighbouring First Nations, to “bring the Ring of Fire project forward,” Gravelle told reporters Tuesday at a conference in Sudbury.

Gravelle attended the Mining Innovation Summit 2016 at which he announced $2.5 million in new funding for the Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation in Sudbury. Part of that money will go toward the Ultra Deep Mining Network, a five-year, $46-million initiative to help companies with deep mines operate safely and efficiently.

The rest of the $2.5 million will go to small- and medium-sized enterprises whose owners have innovative ideas they wish to develop. Continue Reading →