29th July 2015

Rings of Fire (AlJazeera.com – July 29, 2015)

http://www.aljazeera.com/

Opiate addiction and mining developments are threatening the future of Canada’s First Nations rural communities.

In the far north of Canada’s Ontario province, where opiate addiction afflicts the First Nation population, nurse practitioner Mae Katt runs a mobile drug treatment programme.

Her urgent mission is to set up effective programmes to treat this devastated population in the hopes that they will be able to shape their future, on their territory, and become the employment workforce backbone of the coming “Ring of Fire” mining operations.

It is a mammoth challenge, especially as up to 80 percent of the adult population of some communities negotiating the mining developments are addicted to opiates.

This pristine territory is set to emerge as one of the richest mining sites in North America. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, International Media Resource Articles, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

29th July 2015

Mining: Province looks to feds for Ring money – by Carol Mulligan (Sudbury Star – July 29, 2015)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

Ontario has formally asked the federal government to match the $1 billion it has committed to infrastructure for the Ring of Fire with $1 billion from its Building Canada Fund.

Brad Duguid, Ontario’s minister of Economic Development, Employment and Infrastructure, nominated the Ring of Fire project under the national infrastructure component (NIC) of the fund.

The $4-billion NIC supports projects of national significance that have broad public benefits and contribute to Canada’s long-term economic growth and prosperity.

Ontario’s Northern Development and Mines Minister, Michael Gravelle, said the Ring of Fire offers tremendous opportunity. By developing a transportation corridor and building hydroelectric systems, many First Nations will be able to “get off diesel,” said Gravelle.

“We can open up all kinds of economic development opportunities and that’s where the contribution from the federal government is so important.” Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Northern Ontario Politics, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

24th July 2015

Sudbury study to examine mental health of miners – by Carol Mulligan (Sudbury Star – July 24, 2015)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

A research project on the mental health of workers in the mining industry is exactly the type of study Ontario Labour Minister Kevin Flynn would like to see more of in Ontario.

The three-year, $400,000 study, funded by Vale Ltd., is a partnership among the mining company, United Steelworkers and Laurentian University’s Centre for Research in Occupational Safety and Health (CROSH).

The goal of the study, called Mining Mental Health, is to collect information to develop strategies to promote strong mental health among workers in Vale’s Ontario operations.

Flynn paid his first visit to a mine earlier this year when he went underground at Vale’s Coleman Mine.

Travelling 5,000 feet below surface “was quite the experience for a city kid,” Flynn told about 100 people in the lobby of Laurentian’s Ben Avery building Thursday. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Mining Education and Innovation, Mining Labour Issues and History - Sudbury and Global, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Sudbury Basin, Sudbury Laurentian University - Mining Faculties and Research | 0 Comments

24th July 2015

Nishnawbe Aski Nation insists on separate talks with Ontario on energy issues (CBC News Thunder Bay – July 23, 2015)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay

Not everyone is happy about a recently announced pan-Canadian task force on diesel fuels in remote communities.

The Nishnawbe Aski Nation says it’s been trying to deal with electricity issues in its communities for years, and wants separate negotiations with the Ontario government.

In a statement, NAN said some of its member First Nations want to accelerate their energy developments and can’t wait for the new process to get going. “It is NAN’s position … that the unique nature of our territory, demography and remoteness justify a separate negotiations table within the Ontario round-table or [pan-Canadian] task force as NAN First Nations,” the statement said.

“[The First Nations’] energy groups’ progress cannot be impeded by an all-Ontario or [pan-Canadian] approach.”

Ontario, Manitoba, Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories and Yukon established the task force, which will prepare a report that examines efforts that have been, or are currently, underway to reduce diesel use in remote communities, among other things. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Canadian Media Resource Articles, Mining Power Issues, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

22nd July 2015

[Canada/Ontario] Mining needs better policy – Editorial (Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal – July 22, 2015)

Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal is the daily newspaper of Northwestern Ontario.

Provincial and federal governments need to provide more support to the country’s mining sector. The industry is a wealth generator, employing hundreds of people in Northwestern Ontario and across the country, and providing millions of dollars in wages to workers and taxes to government.

Communities like Red Lake and Pickle Lake were created by gold mining booms that continue today. Thunder Bay and other communities in the region supply workers, equipment and expertise to the sector. Very few communities are not receiving some economic spin-offs from mining, a industry that still faces a number of challenges to growth.

As Canada’s energy and mines ministers meet for their 72nd annual conference this week, the country’s exploration and mining industry is asking governments to turn their attention to several areas that are challenging the sector during this period of economic downturn and uncertainty.

A report prepared by the Mining Association of Canada (MAC) and the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) has detailed three policy priorities that will help the industry overcome current challenges and capitalize on the opportunities before it. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Canada Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

22nd July 2015

Ontario mineral exploration slows to a crawl (CBC News Sudbury – July 22, 2015)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury

Low metal prices, government red tape, jittery investors conspire against exploration industry

Mineral exploration in northern Ontario has been on a steady decline for the past four years, and that’s causing some to worry.

The executive director of the Ontario Prospectors Association is used to the cyclical nature of the exploration industry, but he said he isn’t used to this.

“Exploration in northern Ontario is the lowest it’s been, probably since I’ve been in the business, and I’ve been in the business 30 years,” Garry Clark said.

He estimates the number of people employed in the industry is half of what it used to be, when metal prices were up.

Figures from the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines confirm the severity of the situation. The number of active claims in the province has dropped by more than 16,000 thousand in the last five years. And exploration spending in Ontario is down about $100 million, compared to last year. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Canadian Media Resource Articles, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

21st July 2015

[Marathon, Ontario] A mine once stood here: Its name may ring a bell (Barrick Beyond Borders – July 2015)

http://barrickbeyondborders.com/

Visitors to the former David Bell mine near Marathon, Ontario, would never know that there used to be a mine there. Hundreds of saplings dot re-contoured areas, and it’s not uncommon to see black bears rummaging through reclaimed fields for tasty native grasses to snack on.

“This is a part of our commitment to our local stakeholders and the general public — to remediate the land back to what it was when we received it,” says Shane Hayes, Mine Closure Coordinator at Barrick’s Hemlo operation, and part of the team that spearheaded the remediation.

The Hemlo property actually consists of three mines: David Bell, Williams and Golden Giant. Mining operations at David Bell ended in 2010, while operations at Golden Giant concluded in 2014.

Students have helped plant 30,000 trees.

Barrick was responsible for rehabilitating the David Bell mine and various areas of the former Golden Giant site. This involved removing the rock used to build the foundations for several facilities at the site, which had been excavated during the initial development of the mine — and some of it contained gold. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Barrick Gold Corporation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Green Mining, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

20th July 2015

Sugar Zone could be even sweeter, Harte Gold says (Northern Miner – July 17, 2015)

The Northern Miner, first published in 1915, during the Cobalt Silver Rush, is considered Canada’s leading authority on the mining industry.

Development is picking up speed at Harte Gold’s (TSXV: HRT; US-OTC: HRTFF) Sugar Zone deposit, 60 km east of the Hemlo gold camp, with a major financing and recent bulk sampling and toll milling deals.

Harte has signed a letter of intent with Barrick Gold (TSX: ABX; NYSE: ABX) to process a 70,000-tonne bulk sample from the Sugar Zone Mine at its nearby Hemlo Mill, and inked a deal for a gold loan of up to US$6 million from metal merchant Auramet International. The term sheet with Auramet includes an undisclosed working capital facility on top of the loan of physical gold, and a final agreement is expected by the end of August.

In May, Harte Gold signed a preliminary agreement with Sudbury-based Technica Mining for a $20 million fixed price mining contract, and a final agreement is expected before the end of July. Technica expects to mine the first mineralized rock from the bulk sample in January 2016 at a rate of 300 tonnes per day.

“This will get the project started and cash flowing and then the plan is to construct our own mill on site once we have the permitting completed,” says Stephen G. Roman, Harte Gold’s president and chief executive. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Canadian Media Resource Articles, Gold and Silver, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

20th July 2015

NEWS RELEASE: Harte Gold Signs US$6M Term Sheet and Milling Agreement

Toronto – July 16, 2015 – HARTE GOLD CORP. (“Harte Gold”) (TSX: HRT/FSE: H4O/OTC: HRTFF) is pleased to announce a number of recently completed key milestones in support of Harte Gold’s 70,000 tonne Advanced Exploration and Bulk Sampling Program (AEBSP) on the Company’s 100% owned Sugar Zone Gold Deposit located north-east of White River, Ontario.

Highlights – Advanced Exploration and Bulk Sampling Program

• An indicative Term Sheet has been signed with Auramet International LLC for a gold loan of up to US $6,000,000 together with a working capital facility; both of which are subject to due diligence, credit review and legal documentation. Due diligence will begin shortly with a final Agreement expected to be signed by the end of August
• Letter of Intent has been signed with Barrick Gold Corporation to process the 70,000 tonne Sugar Zone Bulk Sample at the nearby Hemlo Mill with the final Agreement expected to be signed by the end of August
• Roadworks to the Portal site on schedule for completion by the end of July
• Initial blasting of the portal location will be initiated in July with collaring in August
• Heads of Agreement for a Fixed Price mining contract has been signed with Technica Mining, final Agreement expected to be signed by the end of July
• Optimized mine plan will accelerate the AEBSP production schedule and shorten project timelines. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Gold and Silver, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

17th July 2015

Progress on Ring of Fire development: slow and fraught with complications – by Jax Jacobsen (SNL.com – July 14, 2015)

https://www.snl.com/

When Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. suspended development on its chromite project in Ontario’s remote Ring of Fire in November 2013, many saw it as an opportunity for the province to get serious about addressing critical infrastructure and Aboriginal issues.

The Ring of Fire region, located in northwestern Ontario near the Manitoba border, is believed to possess between C$30 billion and C$50 billion in mineral resources, with Ontario’s Ministry of Northern Development and Mines estimating its value as high as C$60 billion. The Ontario Chamber of Commerce argued that development will generate as much as C$9.4 billion in GDP and create up to 5,500 jobs on an annual basis, all within the first 10 years of development.

This would be a substantial boon for the region, which is home to numerous First Nations communities but with very little business development or opportunity, due to its lack of transportation infrastructure connecting it to the rest of the province.

In May 2014, Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne pledged C$1 billion for infrastructure spending to encourage mineral development in the region if she were re-elected. Wynne also pledged to create a development corporation to encourage and oversee development there. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery, Stan Sudol Columns/Media References and Appearances | 0 Comments

17th July 2015

Lake Shore rocks the boat on Temex, Oban – by Kip Keen (Mineweb.com – July 17, 2015)

http://www.mineweb.com/

New offer upsets junior multi-merger.

It seems some Temex shareholders were near prescient in spurning Oban Mining. As noted in these pages, back in early June Oban Mining – a vehicle backed by some heavy hitters on the Canadian mining scene – made waves with a rather rare kind of offer: a merger with four other junior exploration companies with cash and/or exploration assets.

The deal involved arrangements with Eagle Hill Exploration, Temex Resources, Ryan Gold and Corona Gold. The former two have smallish, but high-grade gold resources, while the latter two mostly have cash.

In this, there was strong support in favour of the Oban proposition by Eagle Hill, Ryan Gold and Corona shareholders with lock-up share agreements covering 57%, 29% and 45% of their respective share counts.

But Temex was another case. As one analyst noted on a conference call around the time of the deal’s announcement last month, only 1% of Temex shareholders agreed to lockup in the Oban deal. Pitiful, really. Indeed, one disgruntled shareholder noted on that same call that the premium Temex would get in the deal (via shares in Oban) was less than the other juniors were getting. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canadian Media Resource Articles, Gold and Silver, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

15th July 2015

Filmmaker goes home to document Red Lake mining life – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – June 30, 2015)

Established in 1980, Northern Ontario Business provides Canadians and international investors with relevant, current and insightful editorial content and business news information about Ontario’s vibrant and resource-rich North. Ian Ross is the editor of Northern Ontario Business ianross@nob.on.ca.

Abudding Toronto filmmaker has paid an artistic and captivating tribute to his hometown of Red Lake with the release of his first feature-length documentary.

Cliff Caines’ 78-minute film, “A Rock and a Hard Place,” is a nostalgic and critical portrait of a resource-dependent town built upon some of the world’s richest gold deposits.

Under the umbrella of his production company, Headframe Films, the documentary received an honourable mention at the DOXA Documentary Film Festival in Vancouver this past May.

The catalyst for the project was in 2010 when he got wind of rumours that Goldcorp was evaluating the possibility of digging up entire subdivisions of Balmertown, a small community within Red Lake where he grew up, to convert the land into a huge open pit. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Gold and Silver, Mining Documentaries, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Red Lake | 0 Comments

13th July 2015

Ring of Fire: Bring on the mining Marshall Plan (Part 2 of 2) – by Stan Sudol (Sudbury Star – July 13, 2015)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

Editor’s note: This is the second part of a two-part story.

Roads, the best way to find new deposits

One of the first priorities is road transportation. Last March at the PDAC mining convention, the federal and provincial governments jointly announced roughly $800,000 in funding for four of the five isolated First Nations – Webequie, Nibinamik, Neskantaga and Eabametoong – to begin consultations on an east-west road that will connect their communities and the Ring of Fire camp to the provincial highway system. A small baby step of progress.

However, Marten Falls is currently not part of this initiative. While this community is the smallest populated of the Matawa Tribal Council, it probably has the most clout as its traditional territory encompasses the Ring of Fire. Although Webequie is considerably closer to the mining camp, it didn’t receive full-reserve status until 2001. Hence it is critical that Martin Falls be strongly encouraged to join the consortium discussing the road connection.

Manitoba is currently undertaking a visionary initiative to build all-season roads on the east side of Lake Winnipeg (which has similar Canadian Shield geography as in Northwestern Ontario) to connect isolated First Nations communities. The primary reason for the establishment of the East Side Transportation Initiative is to lower travel costs for essential supplies to 13 Aboriginal communities. In addition, winter roads are becoming less dependable due to climate change. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery, Stan Sudol Columns/Media References and Appearances | 0 Comments

13th July 2015

Accent: Bring on the mining Marshall Plan (Part 1 of 2) – by Stan Sudol (Sudbury Star – July 11, 2015)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

Editor’s Note: This is first installment of a two-part story. The second will appear in the Monday edition of The Star.

There has been much commentary about healing and rapprochement with Canada’s First Nations due to the recent Truth and Reconciliation Commission report on the horrific abuse Aboriginal children experienced at residential schools during the last century.

However, if Ontario, which has the largest population of First Nations people in the country, truly wants to make amends for the sins of the past, then we need to look at “economic and social reconciliation” as our primary vehicle for restitution.

Until every First Nation community in the province has the same level of infrastructure and social services as non-Aboriginal towns and cities, most of the remorseful speeches by guilty white politicians are nothing more than hot air.

Without a doubt, some of the most destitute and impoverished First Nations communities are located in Ontario’s mineral-rich but isolated northwest, near the Ring of Fire – the most significant Canadian mineral discovery in almost a century – and in the regions to the west. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery, Stan Sudol Columns/Media References and Appearances | 0 Comments

8th July 2015

We’ll manage mining, thanks – Editorial (Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal – July 8, 2015)

Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal is the daily newspaper of Northwestern Ontario.

Southern Ontario environmental groups should lobby more extensively in their own backyard before briefly flying over and criticizing development in ours.

Last week, Toronto-based Wildlands League said that mining exploration in the Ring of Fire has already caused damage to the Far North’s ecosystem. It released aerial photos showing exploration activity — rudimentary mining camps and a runway.

Wildlands claims that the photos challenge the idea of mining exploration having little impact on the area. What would Wildlands have exploration companies do — drop their employees into the bush by helicopter to sleep on the ground and conduct staking operations without cutting a single tree? The “impact” is a minor intrusion on a massive area of the Far North.

Meanwhile, one has only to look at the constant expansion of urbanization north of Toronto to see what new housing and strip malls can do for the environment — destroy it. The steady advance of development has gobbled up thousands of acres of once productive farmland and wildlife habitat. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Northern Ontario Separation and Alienation, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

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