Archive | Ontario Mining

Canadian Mines Create Indigenous Middle Class in Nunavut – Not in Ring of Fire – by Stan Sudol (July 26, 2017)

It’s been ten years since the world-class Ring of Fire mineral district was discovered in the isolated James Bay Lowlands, about 500 kms northeast of Thunder Bay. Not one mine has been built. During those ten years the equally isolated territory of Nunavut has built two gold mines (Agnico Eagle’s Meadowbank and TMAC Resources’ Doris) and one iron ore operation (Baffinland’s Mary River).

A fourth gold mine (Agnico Eagle) should be in production in 2019 – and Sabina Gold and Silver Corp., a junior exploration company with a very rich precious metal deposit has just been given continued development approvals by the Nunavut Impact Review Board.

Noront Resources is the only significant company in the Ring of Fire with a potentially bankable mineral asset, their nickel/copper Eagle’s Nest deposit, as well as the owner of 75 per cent of the valuable staked claims in the region. The company also has plans to develop an adjacent chromite deposit using the Eagle’s Nest underground infrastructure and is currently looking for a suitable site in northern Ontario to build a ferrochrome processing plant to supply the American market. Continue Reading →

Ring of Pants-on-Fire: Kathleen Wynne’s ‘weeks, not months’ deadline blows by – by John Michael McGrath (TV Ontario – July 25, 2017)

http://tvo.org/

OPINION: This spring, Ontario’s premier seemed determined to speed up negotiations on developing the mineral-rich Ring of Fire — then, nothing happened.

Neither Premier Kathleen Wynne nor the Ontario Liberals generally are predisposed to playing the heavy with Indigenous communities. The Grits won the 2003 election partly on a pledge to establish better relations with Indigenous people, in contrast with the acrimony — and violence — of the Mike Harris years. Wynne has made reconciliation a personal mission in her time as premier.

So it was notable that she wrote a letter this spring to the Matawa Chiefs Council urging a speedy resolution to negotiations on developing the Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich region northeast of Thunder Bay that’s smack-dab in the middle of multiple First Nations territories. Wynne said she hoped for “meaningful progress in weeks, not months” on an agreement to build transportation infrastructure to the chromite and nickel deposits there.

Well, it’s been months, not weeks, yet the government has announced no major progress on an agreement, and the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines had no new details to report this week in response to inquiries from TVO.org. Continue Reading →

Aboriginal-owned Mine company goes belly-up – by Keith Dempsey (Sudbury Star – July 25, 2017)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

A company operating in the Sudbury area has gone bankrupt, despite a $4.3-million infusion from the provincial government in 2013. That information came to light after the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change revealed last week that Mohawk Garnet Inc. was fined more than $300,000 for discharging a harmful contaminant — in this case, dust.

It’s unclear, however, whether the fine will ever be paid, since Mohawk Garnet, which operated on the Wahnapitae First Nation near Capreol, appears to have no money.

“It’s disappointing this company has gone out of business,” said Norm Miller, a Conservative Parry Sound MPP and critic for Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. “This is further proof that the Liberal government’s Northern Growth Plan that was implemented in 2011 is just not working.” Continue Reading →

Würth Canada and Missanabie Cree First Nation sign joint venture agreement – by Rob O’Flanagan (Northern Ontario Business – July 21, 2017)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

The two parties will work together to supply northern Ontario gold mines on Missanabie Cree territory

Würth Canada, headquartered in Guelph, has signed an important agreement with the northern Ontario community of Missanabie Cree First Nation. The First Nation, with traditional lands located about 400 kilometres north of Sault Ste. Marie, has agreements with two private mining companies with operations on those lands.

Chief Jason Gauthier said during an agreement signing event Thursday at Würth’s 345 Hanlon Creek Boulevard location, that the First Nation has agreements to provide services and personnel on some aspects of those mining operations. To meet those obligations, Missanabie Cree has partnered with Würth as a supplier.

The signing included a prayer of thanksgiving, and a gift of tobacco to the Indigenous visitors. Würth is an international company with 70,000 employees worldwide. In 2013, the company had $14 billion in sales. Its Canadian arm was founded in 1971. Continue Reading →

Sage Gold puts the pieces in place for 2018 production – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – July 25, 2017)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Picking up the Clavos Mine near Timmins has been about as turn-key as a mining project gets for Sage Gold. Things have fallen nicely into place for the Toronto developer as the company transitions from being a pure exploration player to becoming a mine operator in one of the world’s richest gold camps by early next year.

The Clavos Gold Project, 32 kilometres northeast of the city, was one of the few fully permitted mines in Canada that was sitting in mothballs in the East Timmins gold camp. Sage completed its phased-in acquisition of the former St. Andrew Goldfields mine last fall and had the provincial government reactivate the mine’s production permit.

With a private equity partner on its side, the company raised $11.5 million last November, and has raised a few million more since then. A good chunk is devoted to refurbishing the portal-and-ramp mine with the aim of restarting commercial production by the second quarter of 2018. Continue Reading →

[Ontario] Research to keep miners cool at extreme depths – by Len Gillis (Timmins Daily Press – July 25, 2017)

http://www.timminspress.com/

New research is underway to help miners stay cooler while working at extreme depths underground. Such research could eventually benefit workers at the Kidd Mine in Timmins, which is the deepest base metal mine in the world.

Research scientist Dr. Stephen Cheung of Brock University said the ultimate goal is to find ways to make miners feel cooler and more comfortable and therefore be able to contribute more to more production. “As you know the deeper you go, the hotter the mines are and the greater the energy costs to ventilate those mines so that the miners can actually be working underground,” said Cheung.

“The idea here really is rather than cooling the entire chamber, it is most likely much more cost effective and efficient to be cooling the individual miners. So that’s kind of the genesis or the idea for the whole project,” he added. Continue Reading →

Porcupine camp remains mineral rich – by Thomas Perry (Timmins Daily Press – June 13, 2016)

http://www.timminspress.com/

Please note this article is over a year old but still very relevant. – Stan Sudol

The Porcupine camp may be more than 100 years old, but that doesn’t mean geologists
have unlocked all its secrets.“There is also a new model in the camp,” van Hees said.

TIMMINS – The Porcupine camp has been producing gold for more than 100 years and there is no indication that is about to change anytime soon. Ed van Hees, Regional Resident Geologist for the Timmins District with the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, points out between Timmins and Kirkland Lake, there are currently 16 operating mines and 13 of those are gold deposits.

“In terms of gold deposits, there are now, I think, 12 deposits that have produced 10 million ounces and three of them are in Timmins — the Holllinger, McIntyre and Dome mines,” he said.

The boundaries of the Porcupine camp are open to interpretation, depending on who you are talking to, but from van Hees’ perspective it extends 30 or 40 kilometres beyond (Tahoe Resources/Lake Shore Gold’s) Timmins West mine and stretches through the Hollinger, Dome McIntyre and 20 to 30 kilometres to the east of the (Glencore Kidd operations) smelter. Continue Reading →

Thunder Bay, Fort William First Nation make the case for Ring of Fire smelter – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – July 20, 2017)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Economic developers take Noront miners on brownfields tour

Thunder Bay and Fort William First Nation made a joint push this week to be the host site for a ferrochrome smelter serving the Ring of Fire.

Local economic development officials took representatives from Noront Resources, the biggest claimholder in the Far North mineral belt, on a tour of area industrial sites, hoping to sway the Toronto mine developer to pick northwestern Ontario for a $600-million to $800-million processing plant.

John Mason, the Thunder Bay Community Economic Development Commission’s mining services project manager, said the tour was basically to give Noront president Alan Coutts and chief development officer Steve Flewelling a better on-the-ground appreciation of what land and infrastructure is available.

The tour took them to the Grand Trunk Railway lands on the Fort William reserve and a mixture of private and government-owned parcels of waterfront brownfields in the Mission and McKellar Islands area. “It was essentially a waterfront, or water-themed, tour,” said Mason. Continue Reading →

Supervisor couldn’t track Sudbury mine’s ‘bump’ — trial – by Harold Carmichael (Sudbury Star – July 20, 2017)

http://www.thesudburystar.com/

The First Nickel Inc. shift supervisor on duty the night a fall of ground at the company’s Lockerby Mine that killed two men was aware there had been a major “bump” or movement of ground at the mine the preceding dayshift.

But, Wade Johnson said Wednesday, he had no idea where the bump had occurred because the mine captain who briefed the night shift team before they started work did not know either. That was because the ground control team had gone home for the day and because no microseismic monitoring charts were available to peruse and isolate the location of the bump, Johnson said.

“There should be a chart: we should know exactly where the bump was,” the veteran miner told the ongoing Ontario Court of Justice trial of First Nickel Inc. and Taurus Drilling. “When I worked at a mine in Lively, there was a refuge station you could see (the charts) and know where the bump was.” Continue Reading →

[Ring of Fire Ferrochome Facility] Thunder Bay in the mix – by Brigitte Petersen (Thunder Bay Chronicle-Journal – July 20, 2017)

http://www.chroniclejournal.com/

Toronto-based mining company Noront Resources revealed its plan to build a ferrochrome processing facility (FPF) in Northern Ontario Wednesday at the Valhalla Inn to a crowd of about 130 people. The company is considering locating the plant, which could initially create up to 350 jobs, in either Thunder Bay, Sault Ste. Marie, Timmins or Sudbury.

The Thunder Bay Community Economic Development Commission (CEDC) and Fort William First Nation Economic Development Corporation invited Noront to deliver a preliminary presentation about plans for the FPF, and to discuss any advancements with the Ring of Fire, a mineral-rich zone located 400 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay.

Chromite is used to make stainless steel. Noront wants to process ferrochrome, an alloy of chromium and iron, to sell to stainless steel producers. “The demand for stainless steel continues to rise,” said Alan Coutts, Noront’s president and CEO, adding that Noront’s ferrochrome product would be shipped to U.S.-based stainless steel plants. Continue Reading →

Romano pressing for mid-August Ring of Fire tour – by Elaine Della-Mattia (Sault Star – July 19, 2017)

http://www.saultstar.com/

“There’s a few challenges that we’re addressing now,” Romano said during a Northern Ontario media conference call led by PC leader Patrick Brown. Romano, elected in a provincial byelection just more than a month ago, has been named Northern Ontario’s critic of jobs and the Ring of Fire.

He said that since starting his role about 40 days ago, he’s met with executives from NorOnt on three occasions and has established a good line of communications with them. “I’m running a lot of laps on this one,” he told The Sault Star. “There is an issue that needs to be resolved and I am trying to assist the Economic Development Corp., who is lead on this one, for their bid submission to NorOnt.”

Brown said if the PC’s form the next provincial government, he vows to build the Ring of Fire transportation corridor and dedicate the funds needed to do so in order to create opportunities in the North. Continue Reading →

Tapping into potential graphite boom no easy task – by Jennifer Wells (Toronto Star – July 12, 2017)

https://www.thestar.com/

Any talk of electric vehicles draws intense response from readers, much of it positive, some of it smartly critical.

Here’s one. “Remember a Tesla battery contains about 150 lbs of graphite which is a product so toxic that it is only allowed to be mined in CHINA (where worker safety is of little importance).”

Yes, China produces the lion’s share of the world’s graphite, as key a component in the lithium-ion battery as the lithium itself. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, China produced 66 per cent of the world’s graphite in 2016. India was a distant second at about 14 per cent. Continue Reading →

Kirkland Lake and the Amazing World-Class Abitibi Gold Mining Belt – Orefinders CEO Stephen Stewart Interviews RepublicOfMining.com’s Stan Sudol (July 10, 2017)


The Abitibi is the largest Archean greenstone belt in the world. It’s roughly 150 km wide and starts just west of Timmins in Ontario – some say it starts in the Wawa camp – stretches for about 650 kms. in an east/west direction to Chibougamau, Quebec.

Since the first gold discovery in Timmins in 1909, the Abitibi has been the source of about 200 million ounces of gold and at least 35 billion pounds of zinc and 15 billion pounds of copper.

Both Ontario and Quebec have a number of significant mining camps. Continue Reading →

Gold from every drill hole: Gowest Gold drills, preps site for future Timmins mine – by Staff (Northern Ontario Business – July 7, 2017)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Gowest Gold found gold mineralization in all 23 drill holes from a recent exploration campaign at its future gold mine near Timmins. The Toronto-based mine developer is in the midst of driving a ramp to take a 30,000-tonne bulk sample at its Bradshaw Gold Deposit.

The company said the advanced drill program was designed to refine the geological model and the stope design in the upper part of the deposit where the sample will be extracted in the third quarter of this year. The 2,097-metre program produced some encouraging gold intercepts, including 7.70 metres at 8.26 grams per tonne (g/t), including 2.0 metre at 22.75 g/t gold.

“This gives us confidence in our resource model and with several holes intersecting gold grades higher than anticipated it supported our interpretation that the Bradshaw Deposit has room to grow and the potential to be a very successful gold mine,” said Gowest exploration director Jeremy Niemi in a July 7 news release. Continue Reading →