26th November 2014

‘Significant progress’ on Ring of Fire: Gravelle – by Darren MacDonald (Sudbury Northern Life – November 26, 2014)

http://www.northernlife.ca/

Responding to a sea of criticism over its handling of the Ring of Fire, the province’s Minister of Northern Development and Mines insisted Tuesday his government’s strategy will make the chromite discovery a success.

Michael Gravelle said he’s pleased with the progress his government has made, despite comments from opposition politicians and business that the $60-billion project is languishing under the Liberal guidance.

“We have a clear plan and we’re implementing it,” Gravelle said, who said they have made significant progress in recent weeks.

But the biggest stakeholders in the project is considerably less optimistic. In an interview last week, Cliffs Natural Resources CEO Lourenco Goncalves told the ‘Financial Post’ there’s “zero” hope infrastructure and other issues plaguing the deposit will be resolved in his lifetime. He said had he been in charge at the time, the company never would have gotten involved with the project.

“And I plan to stay (alive) another 50 years,” he said in the article. “The Ring of Fire is a remote land with no railroad, no road, nothing … Without the infrastructure, there’s nothing we can do.”

Gravelle said Goncalves’ comments were “startling … and just plain unhelpful,” he said. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

26th November 2014

NEWS RELEASE: Rubicon and Wabauskang First Nation Reach a Settlement Agreement and an Exploration Accommodation Agreement

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwired – Nov. 24, 2014) – Rubicon Minerals Corporation (TSX:RMX)(NYSE MKT:RBY) (“Rubicon” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that is has entered into a Settlement Agreement (“Settlement”) and an Exploration Accommodation Agreement (“EAA”) with Wabauskang First Nation (“WFN”).

Under the Settlement, WFN has agreed to discontinue its appeal against Rubicon regarding the August 28, 2014 decision made by the Ontario Divisional Court to dismiss the application for judicial review in respect of Rubicon’s production closure plan for its fully-permitted Phoenix Gold Project (the “Project”). In turn, an EAA has been signed and terms of a potential benefits agreement are outlined in the Settlement.

The EAA governs the Company’s exploration work on WFN lands, which includes the continuing exploration work being done at the Phoenix Gold Project. The key features of the EAA include the following:

WFN will support Rubicon’s exploration work, including support of the application for licenses and permits for such work;

The Company will provide certain benefits to WFN based on exploration expenditures incurred by Rubicon on its mineral claims within lands used by WFN; Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Gold and Silver, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

26th November 2014

Quebec superior to Ontario for exploration, says junior miner [Northern Superior Resources] – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – November 26, 2014)

Established in 1980, Northern Ontario Business provides Canadians and international investors with relevant, current and insightful editorial content and business news information about Ontario’s vibrant and resource-rich North. Ian Ross is the editor of Northern Ontario Business ianross@nob.on.ca.

A million dollars doesn’t stretch as far as it once did; not if you’re in the exploration business in Ontario.

The province may be lauded for its rich mineralogy, but the president of a Sudbury-based junior mining company said it’s become a tad pricier and more risky to find new discoveries compared to Quebec.

“To actually make a discovery takes a huge effort and a lot of money, and you’re going to get a lot farther with that money in Quebec than you are in Ontario right now,” said Tom Morris of Northern Superior Resources. The exploration community is in dire straits with many junior miners struggling to raise project financing and their stocks trading below 10 cents.

The situation doesn’t appear to be getting any easier based on Morris’ recent presentation at a Sudbury mineral symposium describing the myriad obstacles that small mining firms face to operate in Ontario that go beyond just proving up geology.

Based on his company’s experiences in both provinces, Morris delivered a part-business analysis, part-cautionary tale on where the money is spent on a hypothetical million-dollar exploration budget. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Quebec Mining | 0 Comments

26th November 2014

Goldeye Groundwork: Hoping & preparing for Ontario’s next major gold discovery – by Bryan Phelan (Onotassiniik Magazine – Fall 2014)

 http://issuu.com/wawatay/docs/ono_winter_2014_layout/

The mineral exploration agreement between Goldeye Explorations and Sandy Lake First Nation had been a long, long time coming.

Robin Luke Webster was just four years old when his father, Blaine, first staked claims near Sandy Lake in 1986. So much time had passed that Robin had gone from bring a pre-schooler to manager of corporate affairs and community relations at Goldeye, where Blaine is chief executive officer.

Sandy Lake hadn’t supported the initial exploration work that followed Goldeye’s claim staking in the ’80s – line cutting, surface geophysics, an airborne geophysical survey and a limited amount of drilling – so the project was put on hold. Goldeye tried to re-activate the project in the early 2000s, but Sandy Lake still wasn’t ready to endorse it. Representatives of the First Nation and Goldeye began to talk with each other at that time, however, and by 2004 the band council had assigned one of its members for liaison with Goldeye.

Finally, in the summer of 2013, Goldeye got the go-ahead to channel sample some of its claims in the Sandy Lake Greenstone belt, part of the First Nation’s traditional lands, and the results showed “significant gold values.” At the suggestion of a Sandy Lake resident, the exploration project name became “Weebigee,” Oji-Cree for the goldeye fish in area waters. And on Nov. 18 that year, Chief Bart Meekis of Sandy Lake and Blaine Webster signed a formal, five-year exploration agreement for Weebigee project activities.

Robin, who joined his father at Goldeye as an advisor in 2012, attended the signing, which took place in the council chamber at the Sandy Lake band office. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Gold and Silver, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

26th November 2014

Sandy Lake blessing for gold exploration – by Bryan Phelan (Onotassiniik Magazine – Fall 2014)

 http://issuu.com/wawatay/docs/ono_winter_2014_layout/

Robin Luke Webster, president of Goldeye Explorations, figures he spent about three months of a recent one-year period in Sandy Lake First Nation. It has been an extraordinary but necessary investment of time, Webster has found.

With the First Nation’s blessing, Goldeye has been exploring for gold on its mining claims south of Sandy Lake since 2013. The junior exploration company is based in Richmond Hill, Ontario, part of the Greater Toronto Area.

“First Nations and exploration companies need to understand each other better,” Webster says during a presentation at the Ontario Mining Forum in June. “In Sandy Lake, community members had no idea what exploration is and on our first visits there we had no idea what a remote First Nation is.”

Webster helped the learning process along by spending 92 days in Sandy Lake during the preceding year, when he held the titles of manager and then vice-president of corporate affairs and community relations for Goldeye. “None of that is project related; it’s just talking to people,” he says of that time in the community. “It’s not easy. A junior (exploration company) can’t really afford that time but that’s what we’ve got to do.”

Webster’s outreach activities in Sandy Lake have included hosting an information booth during Treaty Day and a community feast, supporting participation of youth hockey teams in the regional Little Bands tournament and making home visits to local elders. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Gold and Silver, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

26th November 2014

NEWS RELEASE: Atikameksheng Anishwabek & KGHM International Sign Advanced Exploration Agreement for the Victoria Project

Sudbury, Canada, November 21, 2014 – Atikameksheng Anishnawbek First Nation

(“Atikameksheng”) and KGHM International Ltd. (“KGHMI”) are pleased to announce that they recently signed the Victoria Project Advanced Exploration Agreement (“the Agreement”) on September 26th, 2014. The Agreement details the Advanced Exploration stage of the Victoria Project (the “Project”) including shaft sinking, bulk sample and diamond drilling. The official signing was completed by Chief Steve Miller and Adrian McFadden, Vice President, Underground Operations for KGHMI in front of several Atikameksheng council members and KGHMI employees. A formal signing ceremony at Atikameksheng Community Centre was held Friday, November 7, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET.

The Agreement includes provisions on how the Atikameksheng will benefit from the development of the Project, including employment and training opportunities, business development opportunities, and compensation for temporary interferences with the exercise of aboriginal and treaty rights by the Atikameksheng. The Agreement also establishes a Community Liaison Committee with representation by both Atikameksheng and KGHMI to share information about the progress of the Victoria Advanced Exploration Project and to monitor the implementation of the Agreement.

The Agreement reflects KGHMI’s commitment to protecting the environment and wildlife, and working with aboriginal communities affected by their operations in a spirit of respect and cooperation.

Adrian McFadden, Vice President, Underground Operations for KGHMI stated, “To date, it has been a positive and educational experience working with Chief Miller and the Atikameksheng Anishnawbek. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Ontario Mining, Sudbury | 0 Comments

25th November 2014

Agreement benefits Goldcorp, First Nations – by Ron Grech (Timmins Daily Press – November 25, 2014)

The Daily Press is the city of Timmins broadsheet newspaper.

TIMMINS – Porcupine Gold Mines has signed an historic resource development agreement with four local First Nation communities.

“What it does is pave the way for the future of the operations so it allows for business opportunities, it allows for employment and training, it allows for some help with education and what it allows is for consultation,” explained Marc Lauzier, mine general manager at Goldcorp’s Porcupine Gold Mines. “It sets a good system for us to consult with the communities, listen to the communities, and to make sure we consider all of their concerns in our future plans and our future operations.

“In the absence of this agreement,” he added, “it would definitely make it difficult to apply for permits to bring on new projects or modify closure plans.”

The four Aboriginal communities that co-signed the agreement are Mattagami First Nation, Wahgoshig First Nation, Matachewan First Nation and Flying Post First Nation.

The formal signing, held at Cedar Meadows Resort in Timmins on Monday, followed traditional Aboriginal ceremonies, smudging and drumming. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Gold and Silver, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining | 0 Comments

25th November 2014

Leadership race: Ring of Fire ignites PC debate – by Carol Mulligan (Sudbury Star – November 25, 2014)

The Sudbury Star is the City of Greater Sudbury’s daily newspaper.

It was the last question at the first Ontario Progressive Conservative leadership debate, submitted online by a man from Huntsville. But it fired up candidates and an audience of about 150 people, most party faithful, at College Boreal on Monday night.

Whitby-Oshawa MPP Christine Elliott, Nipissing MPP Vic Fedeli, Nepean-Carleton MPP Lisa MacLeod and Barrie MP Patrick Brown were asked what their plans were to spur development of the Ring of Fire.

“We’ve heard a lot of talk and promises from the Liberals,” wrote the Huntsville resident, “but no real plan to move forward.” All four candidates couldn’t have agreed more with that statement.

Fedeli summed up the frustration of northerners with the lack of development of the chromite deposits 500 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay at the first of six debates before a new party leader is named May 9.

A former two-term mayor of North Bay, Fedeli said he remembered the Liberals’ Northern Development and Mines minister visiting his town to talk about this “great, vast find.” Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Cliffs Natural Resources, Northern Ontario Politics, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

25th November 2014

Canada’s unheard aboriginal narrative – by Lawrence Martin (Globe and Mail – November 25, 2014)

The Globe and Mail is Canada’s national newspaper with the second largest broadsheet circulation in the country. It has enormous influence on Canada’s political and business elite.

Canada’s rank racism toward aboriginal peoples was institutionalized within the fundamentals of European philosophy and culture, says maverick thinker John Ralston Saul. Europeans insisted their principles were universal. “Of course they were universal. After all, they said they were.”

With their technological and cultural sophistication came a conviction of racial superiority. They were so superior, the writer adds, that they proceeded to massacre one another, as the aboriginals quizzically looked on, in one world war and then a second. A hundred million died in less than half a century.

More wars followed, along with more racist attitudes toward the destined losers. In more recent times, a more sympathetic attitude has been adopted toward indigenous peoples, but it still smacks of soft racism, according to Mr. Saul.

What’s missing, he robustly contends in his new book, The Comeback, is the realization that aboriginal peoples have been making a remarkable recovery and are now on the verge of taking a prominent place in this country. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Canada Mining, Canadian Media Resource Articles | 0 Comments

25th November 2014

How to Avoid a $1-Billion Boondoggle – by Bill Gallagher (Onotassiniik Magazine – Winter 2014)

http://issuu.com/wawatay/docs/ono_winter_2014_layout/

‘Boondoggle’: any unnecessary and wasteful project
‘Billion’: a thousand million (Webster’s Dictionary)

A billion dollars is an attention-getting number. That’s no doubt why the Wynne Liberals touted that number as a campaign pledge in the run-up to their recent election win. This $1-billion dollar carrot arose after the party politically ‘rediscovered’ the Ring of Fire as a slumbering engine of economic growth for the province.

Buried in the election budget was the glossed-over detail that the Queen’s Park $1-billion was contingent on Ottawa making a matching billion. The feds quickly set this sleight-of-hand straight; whereupon the Wynne Liberals confirmed on the hustings that they were good for their $1-billion dollar pledge no matter what.

On the industry side of the ledger, as Cliffs Natural Resources slowly realized that it was taking a fiscal cold shower on its rushed expansion into Canada; it took its own billion dollar write down on its Bloom Lake iron project in Quebec. (‘Write-down’ is an accounting term used to describe a reduction of the book value of an asset due to economic or fundamental changes in an asset.) Cliffs will likely take another major write down on account of its botched Ring of Fire investment. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Cliffs Natural Resources, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 1 Comment

25th November 2014

Three of Canada’s premiers have a golden opportunity to serve the national interest – by Kelly McParland (National Post – November 24, 2014)

The National Post is Canada’s second largest national paper.

The leaders of three of Canada’s biggest provinces have a golden opportunity to contribute to the growth and prosperity of the country, throwing their weight behind a project of national interest while helping create jobs and support their own economies. To do so, however, may require two of them to demonstrate leadership in the face of short-term populist agendas with strong — if ill-informed — emotional pull.

Last week premiers Kathleen Wynne of Ontario and Philippe Couillard of Quebec agreed to follow a coordinated strategy in dealing with the Energy East project, the $12-billion pipeline that would move Alberta crude to the East Coast. Responding to popular concern about the impact of the pipeline on a range of interests, they issued a list of conditions to be met, including consultations with First Nations; due consideration of greenhouse gas emissions, adoption of the highest standards of safety and protection of the natural gas supply for consumers.

None of the conditions is unreasonable – what company is going to object to a demand for high safety standards? What’s worrying is the sense that Canada’s two biggest provinces may be positioning themselves for a repetition of the aggressive opposition adopted by British Columbia’s government in regard to several pipeline projects that would cross B.C. to Pacific ports.

Seeking to bolster her party’s low standing in polls before the most recent election, B.C. Premier Christy Clark took a combative approach to the $6.5 billion Northern Gateway project running from Alberta to Kitimat. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Canadian Media Resource Articles, Oil and Gas Sector-Politics and Image | 0 Comments

24th November 2014

RINGS of DEVELOPMENT: Maximizing Ring of Fire benefits requires simultaneous planning at local First Nation, tribal council and NAN levels – by John van Nostrand (Onotassiniik Magazine – Winter 2014)

http://issuu.com/wawatay/docs/ono_winter_2014_layout/1

http://www.replan.ca/

John van Nostrand is the Principal at rePlan Inc., a company that provides social assessment, advisory and management services to natural resource companies and financial institutions around the world.

Mines are like the proverbial pebble in the pond – they have profound circles of influence. Their impacts range from the economic to the environmental to the social. They affect national, regional and local economies, entire watersheds and ecosystems, and the towns, farmlands and hunting grounds that communities around them occupy.

The Ring of Fire is one of the largest pebbles ever to be dropped in the pond we call Ontario. It will create an economy estimated at more than $50 billion. It will have a broad impact on over 60 per cent of the province, and a direct impact on an area four times larger than the Timmins/Sudbury Mining Region in northeastern Ontario.

Development of that region began more than 100 years ago when major ore, nickel and silver deposits were exposed around Sudbury and Cobalt during the building of the railway to the Clay Belt. But with the Ring of Fire, there is a very real opportunity to prepare and plan – ahead of development – in order to maximize the benefits for not only for the mining companies and our provincial coffers, but also the 49 communities of Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) and other Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations that currently live in the region. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 1 Comment

24th November 2014

Grand Chief pushing power plan for Ring of Fire – by Jeff Labine (Timmins Daily Press – November 21, 2014)

The Daily Press is the city of Timmins broadsheet newspaper.

TIMMINS – The Mushkegowuk Council, a large Northeastern Ontario Aboriginal organization, is positioning itself to become a major player in the Ring of Fire development by providing electrical energy to that whole project.

Lawrence Martin, the newly elected Grand Chief of the Mushkegowuk Council, told The Daily Press Friday that plans are being worked on to bring upwards of a thousand megawatts of energy from Quebec to service the Ring of Fire and to service Timmins if a smelter is needed here. He said this can all be done through the corporate jurisdiction of Five Nations Energy Inc., an Aboriginal energy distribution company.

Martin, who will be sworn in as the new grand chief on Tuesday, said the Mushkegowuk Council has been discussing major electrical infrastructure improvements for many months already.

Just a few years ago, Martin was known as the Mayor of Cochrane. He was elected to the post of grand chief that was left vacant by the death of well-known Grand Chief Stan Louttit, who died in June after a struggle with cancer.

Martin was elected in a recent council by-election over six other candidates, also well-known within the Mushkegowuk First Nations communities. They were Peter Wesley, Roderick Sutherland, Theresa Hall, Annie Metat, Peter Nakogee and Edward Nakogee. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

21st November 2014

Lies we wish were true [Ring of Fire transportation] – by David Robinson (Northern Ontario Business – November 2014)

Established in 1980, Northern Ontario Business  provides Canadians and international investors with relevant, current and insightful editorial content and business news information about Ontario’s vibrant and resource-rich North.  

Dave Robinson is an economist with the Institute for Northern Ontario Research and Development at Laurentian University.drobinson@laurentian.ca 

Here is a fantasy about Northern development and the Ring of Fire. Everyone in the story really exists. Not a single event in the story has happened — yet.

In late 2014, the chief of the Moose Cree First Nation, Norm Hardisty, wrote to Stephen McGlennan, CEO of Hybrid Air Vehicles in Britain, asking if their Airlander 50 would be a suitable vehicle for CreeWest, a First Nations-owned air carrier. Hardisty didn’t have a clear plan in mind, but he knew that if First Nations controlled an essential transportation system they would be big winners in the development of Ontario’s North. McGlennan phoned Hardisty back saying he would fly a half-dozen people to the hangar in London where the radical airship is being built.

According to the International Business Review, McGlennan’s super blimp has a top speed of 160 kilometres per hour, can carry 50 tons of equipment, and can operate in the most extreme weather. If there is no runway, it can deliver 20 tons to any clearing bigger than a football field. In comparison, a CH-47 Chinook helicopter can only lift a maximum of 10 tons. And helicopters are fuel hogs. The Airlander has much better fuel efficiency than any conventional aircraft. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Northern Ontario/Canada Regional Media, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

21st November 2014

Ring of Fire is ‘beyond the point of no return,’ mining company says – Bill Curry and Bertrand Marotte (Globe and Mail – November 20, 2014)

The Globe and Mail is Canada’s national newspaper with the second largest broadsheet circulation in the country. It has enormous influence on Canada’s political and business elite.

Ottawa and MONTREAL – The Ring of Fire project is “beyond the point of no return” in spite of renewed government pledges to move ahead, says the CEO of the mining company that owns the rights to most of the resources in the remote Northern Ontario mineral deposit.

Cliffs Natural Resources Inc. CEO Lourenco Goncalves made headlines last month with his declaration that he had “zero hope” that the Ring of Fire would be developed in his lifetime.

In an interview with The Globe and Mail this week, Mr. Goncalves said recent pledges from the federal and Ontario governments to support the project with public infrastructure cash have not changed his assessment of the project’s viability.

“Last month I said it would not happen in the next 50 years. This month I will say it’s not going to happen in 49 years and 11 months,” he said. “We are beyond the point of no return.”

The Cleveland-based company bought three chromite deposits in 2010 for $350-million and has spent about $200-million on development. Since large chromite deposits were first discovered in 2008, estimates have pegged the mineral potential of the region at $60-billion. Read the rest of this entry »

posted in Aboriginal and Inuit Mining, Canada Mining, Canadian Media Resource Articles, Cliffs Natural Resources, Ontario Mining, Ontario's Ring of Fire Mineral Discovery | 0 Comments

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